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Mendel Medal Award
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The Mendel Medal Award

At Villanova University, Gregor Mendel is remembered in special ways. Mendel Hall, the University's huge science and research center, is equipped with the most modern facilities for study and research. The Mendel Medal, established to recognize scientific accomplishment and religious conviction, is awarded in Gregor Mendel's honor and universally perpetuates his memory.
Candidates for the medal are selected in accordance with the following precepts: "The Mendel Medal is awarded to outstanding scientists who have done much by their painstaking work to advance the cause of science; and by the spirituality of their lives and their standing before the world as scientists, have given practical demonstration of the fact that between true science and true religion there is no real conflict."
In keeping with the ecumenical spirit of our times, the medal is awarded to a scientist of any faith whose life and work merit such recognition. the medal was first awarded in 1929 and given annually until 1943. Between 1946 and 1968, the medal was awarded eight times.
In 1993 Villanova University reestablished the Mendel Medal to confirm its original purpose of honoring the achievements and memory of Gregor Mendel as well as the work of an outstanding contemporary scientist.

 

clayside1sm.JPGThe Mendel Medal.

The obverse side of the original plaster model of the Mendel Medal designed by John R. Sinnock in 1929. He was the chief engraver of the US Mint for many years. In this capacity, he also designed the Roosevelt dime, the current Purple Heart, the Franklin half dollar, the Congressional medal awarded to Thomas Edison and many other official commemorative medals. Courtesy of Villanova University Archives.

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The inscription on the reverse side of the original plaster model of the Mendel Medal created by John R. Sinnock in 1929 encircled by a wreath of sweet-peas is: Augustinian College of Villanova. For Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Science. Courtesy of Villanova University Archives.


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The obverse side of the medal designed and sculpted by John R. Sinnock is Gregor Johann Mendel, O.S.A. (1822-1884), clothed in the Augustinian habit and examining a sweet-pea. At one side appears a microscope as it looked in Mendel's time. Courtesy of Villanova University Archives.

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The reverse side of the Mendel Medal depicts an adaptation of the Villanova University's seal encircled by a wreath of sweet-peas with the inscription: For Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Science. Courtesy of Villanova University Archives.


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The Mendel Bulletin. It first appeared in 1929 and continued publications until 1969. The publication is a tribute to Gregor J. Mendel, an Augustinian Geneticist. Courtesy of Villanova University Archives.

 

 

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Rev. Pierre Teilhard de Chardin S.J., Paleontologist with the National Geographical Survey of China was the 1937 recipient of the Mendel Medal Award. He was awarded this medal for his achievement in tracing the antiquity of man in Eastern Asia as far back as the ice age. Courtesy of Villanova University Archives.

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Cablegram sent by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, S.J. This telegram, sent from China, indicates his acceptance of the invitation to receive the Mendel Medal. Courtesy of Villanova University Archives.

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Invitation to the Mendel Medal Award. This award was given on 22 March 1937 to theologian Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, S.J. Courtesy of Villanova University Archives.

 


singersm.JPG Dr. Maxine F. Singer, President, Carnegie Institution of Washington; Scientist Emeritus, Laboratory of Biochemistry, Division of Cancer Biology and Diagnosis, National Cancer Institute of Health, Bethesda, Md. was the 1996 recipient of the Mendel Medal. Reverend Edmund J. Dobbin, O.S.A., S.T.D., University President on left and Reverend Kail C. Ellis, O.S.A., Ph.D., Dean, College of Arts and Sciences on right. Courtesy of Villanova University Archives.

 

amazlightsm.JPGAmazing Light. Written by Dr. Charles H. Townes' former students and colleagues in honor of his 80th birthday.
Dr. Townes, Professor in the graduate school, the University of California at Berkley, Inventor of the maser and laser; Nobel Laureate in Physics (1964) was the 1999 recipient of the Mendel Medal Award. Courtesy of Dr. Charles H. Townes.


The Mendel Medal Recipients

2002 Recipient, Dr. Ruth Patrick

Past Recipients