FALVEY MEMORIAL LIBRARY

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Domination and Resistance

Domination and Resistance




 

Lion of Belgium

‘Zij Zullen Hem Niet Temmen’, Jules Verveeke: De Oorlogsspion, No. 11, front cover, 1914, published by Roman-Boekhandel: Amsterdam, Netherlands

“They will never tame him,” claims this periodical.[1] The lion, a prominent feature upon the Belgium flag and coat of arms, quite obviously represents that country in this cover page illustration for a Belgium dime novel. Crouched in a belligerent position, with teeth bared and claws extended, the large cat terrifies the opposing soldiers, who begin a retreat with arms covering their faces.  Playing on the stereotyped aggression of the male lion, the illustrator uses the feline to embody the Dutch soldiers who successfully halted the German advance during the Battle of Yser in WWI.

 

 

Animal Monuments

Philadelphia and Notable Philadelphians, Plate 50, 1902, King, Moses, published by M. King: New York, USA

This plate outlines a few notable animal monuments of Philadelphia, all erected in the late nineteenth century. The “Washington Equestrian,” inspired by the Frederick the Great statue in Berlin, depicts the first president sitting astride a horse. The base of the statue, amongst scenes of the development of the nation, includes bronze figures of Native American people and animals, suggesting domination. “Lion Fighter,” complement to “Mounted Amazon Attack by a Panther” in Berlin, contradicts the value of animals as resistance to tyranny, as the human vanquishes the beast, showing the superiority of humanity over the wild. The “Lioness Carrying Boar to her Young” demonstrates the prowess and tenderness of a mother for her young. Finally, the “Hudson Bay Wolves” fight over the carcass of a deer in a show of aggression, with one canine aware of its own superiority, tail erect, ears forward, and standing on the high ground – all in direct contrast to the competitor.

 

References

[1] ‘Zij Zullen Hem Niet Temmen’Jules Verveeke: De Oorlogsspion, No. 11, front cover, 1914, published by Roman-Boekhandel: Amsterdam, Netherlands