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Food, Fur, Furnishing

Food, Fur, Furnishing




 

Our Beautiful Furs

The Girl’s Own Paper, Vol. XIX, No. 949, p. 364, March 5 1898, London, UK

In a rare form of acknowledgement of the previous life which provided clothing and accessories, this article reviews a short list of fur providers. The text briefly covers the habitat and behaviors of these creatures, then states what clothing or other merchandise their hide provides, such as carriage wrappers.

 

 

Fur Trousers

The Life of Pope Leo XIII: Memorial Edition Illustrated, abridged, Plate facing p. 165, c. 1908, Miller, J. Martin

While the above article on fur sources refers to the product use among the well-to-do as a luxury, this image of peasants from Carpineto, Italy sheds light on another consumer type. Many factors contribute to the distinction of animal parts used for the elite versus the poor. Generally, the wealthy make use of exotic and rare animals, as well as small, dainty byproducts. Conversely, lower classes tend to utilize sturdy animal products which can be obtained locally.

 

 

Mince Meat

Philadelphia and its Environs, and the Railroad Scenery of Pennsylvania, selection from p. 12, 1875, published by J.B. Lippincott: Philadelphia, USA

Advertised as the “Oldest House in the Trade. Established 1842,” this company labors with the sale of cow meat.[1] In addition to its solid foundation in time, the corporation boasts equal quality to imported meat at half the cost.

 

 

Horse Skull

Wildtöter, selection from front cover, c. 1915-1930, Germany

Just as animal heads or horns signify objectification in hunting trophies, so too this horse skull detaches the remains from the living creature. Rather, the bones enhance the undertone of death in the scene, as well as provide context of location through the local fauna.

 

 

Sewer Vermin

'Les Miserables,' from Classics Illustrated, No. 9, front cover, Hugo, Victor, published by Gilberton Company, Inc.: New York, USA

The red-eyed rats scurrying about the sewers of Paris, “fetid with cesspools,” merely serve to complement the scene.[2] The grimy rodents emphasize the dank and foul atmosphere in which the protagonist finds himself. Furthermore, the single rat jumping over Jean’s lifted heel helps to surround the man in the milieu, entangling him in the background which contains the vermin.

 

References

[1] Philadelphia and its Environs, and the Railroad Scenery of Pennsylvania, p. 12, 1875, published by J.B. Lippincott: Philadelphia, USA

[2] 'Les Miserables,' from Classics Illustrated, No. 9, Hugo, Victor, published by Gilberton Company, Inc.: New York, USA